Programming Languages Reading Group
Spring 2023

Augusta University Programming Languages (PL) Reading Group is a regular meeting to discuss exciting recent results in programming languages research. The intent of the group is to learn about various ideas and generally broaden perspectives on PL research topics. We randomly select papers from the major PL conferences.

We meet weekly on Fridays, 1-2 pm, at UH 122 conference room.

We encourage everyone to join our reading group. Even if your primary focus is not PL, this is a chance to learn about various new topics that may become relevant to you later. It is also simply fun to hang out with us.

Discussion We have a PL discussion channel at CS Grad Students discord.

Semester Papers

  1. Accattoli, Beniamino, and Giulio Guerrieri. “The Theory of Call-by-Value Solvability.” Proceedings of the ACM on Programming Languages, vol. 6, no. ICFP, Aug. 2022, pp. 855–85. Crossref, https://doi.org/10.1145/3547652.
  2. Rioux, Nick, et al. “A Bowtie for a Beast: Overloading, Eta Expansion, and Extensible Data Types in F⋈.” Proceedings of the ACM on Programming Languages, vol. 7, no. POPL, Jan. 2023, pp. 515–43. Crossref, https://doi.org/10.1145/3571211.
  3. Fu, Peng, et al. “Proto-Quipper with Dynamic Lifting.” Proceedings of the ACM on Programming Languages, vol. 7, no. POPL, Jan. 2023, pp. 309–34. Crossref, https://doi.org/10.1145/3571204.
  4. Dash, Swaraj, et al. “Affine Monads and Lazy Structures for Bayesian Programming.” Proceedings of the ACM on Programming Languages, vol. 7, no. POPL, Jan. 2023, pp. 1338–68. Crossref, https://doi.org/10.1145/3571239.
  5. Baumann, Pascal, et al. “Context-Bounded Verification of Context-Free Specifications.” Proceedings of the ACM on Programming Languages, vol. 7, no. POPL, Jan. 2023, pp. 2141–70. Crossref, https://doi.org/10.1145/3571266.
  6. Labrada, Elizabeth, et al. “Plausible Sealing for Gradual Parametricity.” Proceedings of the ACM on Programming Languages, vol. 6, no. OOPSLA1, Apr. 2022, pp. 1–28. Crossref, https://doi.org/10.1145/3527314.
  7. Ding, Shuo, and Qirun Zhang. “Witnessability of Undecidable Problems.” Proceedings of the ACM on Programming Languages, vol. 7, no. POPL, Jan. 2023, pp. 982–1002. Crossref, https://doi.org/10.1145/3571227.
  8. Thokair, Mosaad Al, et al. “Dynamic Race Detection with O(1) Samples.” Proceedings of the ACM on Programming Languages, vol. 7, no. POPL, Jan. 2023, pp. 1308–37. Crossref, https://doi.org/10.1145/3571238.
  9. Abreu, Pedro, et al. “A Type-Based Approach to Divide-and-Conquer Recursion in Coq.” Proceedings of the ACM on Programming Languages, vol. 7, no. POPL, Jan. 2023, pp. 61–90. Crossref, https://doi.org/10.1145/3571196.

Awards

Award Categories

The Great Teacher Inspires

With dense figures, symbols, syntax, and semantics, PL research is revered for its traditions and high standards. This sometimes makes papers look intimidating to novice students. This award recognizes a publication for presenting a rigorous technical contribution, while also including aspects of teaching to make the topic accessible to junior community members.

The Rolex

The famous Swiss watch is a symbol of quality, precision, durability and elegance. Just like its namesake, this award recognizes a publication for its refinement and expertise in artisanship and careful perfection of details.

The Cool Guy 😎

Some people just pull you in with the way they are. It does not necessarily matter what exactly they say, or whether all of it makes sense to you. But just thinking about them makes you feel good. Similarly some papers just leave you thinking “This is so cool, I really want to learn more about this,” and this award recognizes such a paper.

Ahead of its Time

Some publications endure the test of time, and remain relevant for decades to come. While we cannot know which recent of publications will end up among the stars, we can take a guess. And that’s always fun. This award is for the paper we think will remain relevant the longest.

The Close Shave

This work nearly fell victim to complexity but instead found a brilliantly simple solution, being saved by the application of Occam’s Razor. This is awarded to those that took complex problems and conquered them with surprisingly elegent or simple solutions.

Teaching a Researcher to Fish

Some paper’s offer elegent solutions to hard problems. This award however is awarded to those who went the extra mile and applied novel and interesting techniques to achieve this. This work is awarded to a paper that elegently exemplifies a tool that should be in every researchers belt.

Winners

  • The Great Teacher Inspires: “Dynamic Race Detection with O(1) Samples.” by Thokair, Mosaad Al, et al.
  • The Rolex: “A Type-Based Approach to Divide-and-Conquer Recursion in Coq.” by Abreu, Pedro, et al.
  • The Cool Guy 😎: “Affine Monads and Lazy Structures for Bayesian Programming.” by Dash, Swaraj, et al.
  • Ahead of its Time: “Proto-Quipper with Dynamic Lifting.” by Fu, Peng, et al.
  • The Close Shave: “Dynamic Race Detection with O(1) Samples.” by Thokair, Mosaad Al, et al.
  • Teaching a Researcher to Fish: “The Theory of Call-by-Value Solvability.” by Accattoli and Guerrieri.

Past Semesters

School of Computer and Cyber Sciences Augusta University